aishajamil

“Nigga, Please.”

In 2010 on March 26, 2010 at 4:20 am

We all see it. We all hear it. We all face it. We all do it.   

What is it about the human nature that makes us discriminate?  Why are we so prejudiced?  Racist?  Xenophobic?   

We walk the other way and clutch our purses tighter when we see a black man. We cover our bodies as we pass by a group of hispanic men. We ignore the female comment about the latest March Madness basketball game. And we automatically think that the Muslim family on the airplane praying is related to Al Qaeda. Oh, and that Jewish man over there is definitely a cheapass.   

What is it about racism that attracts us? Society obviously deems it an unnecessary evil. So, why is it then that we continue this cycle of discrimination?   

As startling as it may sound, for most of human history, racism did not exist. There was very little to almost no interaction between different ethnic backgrounds.   

Racism started to take its root after the collapse of the first Indus Valley civilization. The Aryans, who migrated from Central Asia to India, established the first legal caste system, separating the light and dark-skinned tribes. The light skinned Aryan tribes overlooked the dark-skinned Dravidian tribes. Light versus the dark.   

Personally, I never understood it.   

Why is it that dark or black is connotated with evil?   

Even in the Babylonian Talmud, the descendants of Noah’s son Ham are “cursed by being black” and Ham is a “sinful man.”   

From these ancient practices and texts to the modern day Rush Limbaughs to our inner selves’, racism exists everywhere.   

Coming from a world of stereotypes and prejudices, I never realized the full extent of what certain words or acts can impose on certain people.   

I thought that saying the words “nigga” or “spic” were a part of an everyday vocabulary that oozed the new generation’s attitude. Say “nigga” so much that it loses its meaning.   

I was wrong.   

Despite the thousands of songs out there that use racial words as a common greeting, these racist terms still have their roots in well….racism.   

They were derived from hate and that will always be their origin no matter how many times we use it.   

So, next time, as you are walking down the city sidewalk, take a good look at your nearby surroundings and for once in your life, don’t judge. Don’t discriminate. Don’t stereotype. Instead, look at the Italian man. Look at the Syrian woman.  Look at the German transsexual.   

And cross out all the racial adjectives that divide us all.   

For once, just look at the human, for God’s Sake.   

The 2OO8 Debate

    

    

 

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  1. Also lets not forget Gays and Lesbians. One of my biggest pet peeve is when someone says, “That’s so gay” not realizing the impact on someone who is actually gay. People usually say that as they are making fun of something or someone — I’d be interested in seeing people’s reaction if everyone started saying, Oh my god that is so White, or that is so Muslim, or that is so Black — The test of courage comes when we are in the minority but the test of tolerance comes when we are in the majority. To your point, being human will get us there faster.

    • I was actually originally going to include that same blog but then decided against it and thought gay should have a blog on its own. I hate it when people do that. I have many gay and lesbian friends and they deserve the same amount of respect that the rest of us get.

  2. Nice post Aisha. I’ve been enjoying your blog a bunch. Good thoughts.

    I think we use racist language because it’s a way to always make us look better and elevate ourselves in comparison to the people around us. Our thinking seems to be; if we can make someone feel/seem/look like the “other,” than how we treat them won’t matter because they are less than us to begin with.

    I think also that wanting to be better than those around us is human nature. Plus it makes any type of conflict against those parties easier, because we can tell ourselves that they are less than us, deserve to be conquered, destroyed, hurt, kept down, etc. Then we can take their land, deny them rights, and make them feel like 2nd class citizens or not citizens at all. In its extreme that type of mentality, believing that someone is inherently worse than you as a person because of their skin, sex, belief, tradition that leads to genocide and ethnic cleaning. The Holocaust and more recently the Rwandan genocide are good examples of this.

    • Thanks A.J.
      I appreciate it. We, as humans, love to put others down to make ourselves seem higher. Hopefully, someday, we will learn and know better.

  3. racism is bad

    stereotyping on the other hand is not always bad and has its uses

  4. this article is so gay … lol

  5. Good blog Aisha. In regards to the association of evil to darkness and vice versa, I believe its roots can be found in Zoroastrianism, which first related light (i.e., fire) with goodness and darkness with evil. The Abrahamic faiths (Islam, Christianity and Judaism) were all impacted by Zoroastrian beliefs, which could explain the deep roots of this sort of concept in our culture today. It definitely doesn’t make it right but the first step to change is awareness I think. Keep up the thoughtful writing!

  6. […] “Nigga, Please.” March 2010 9 comments 5 […]

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